Birds & Birders in the Urban Forest



Hawks and Hummingbirds – birds commonly seen in the Urban Forest.

Since September 2020 on the last Thursday of each month, birding enthusiasts descend upon the Urban Forest. They use an application called eBird to count all birds they spy during their visit. Here’s what the eBird website says about the impact their efforts have:

eBird plays an increasingly important and diverse role in applied science and conservation. eBird data contribute to hundreds of conservation decisions and peer-reviewed papers, thousands of student projects, and help inform research worldwide. Applications of eBird data range from research and monitoring to conservation planning, including tangible conservation actions such as site and habitat management, species management, habitat protection, and informing law and policy … we are committed to ensuring that your data will be put to the best use possible for research, conservation, and education.

eBird data document bird distribution, abundance, habitat use, and trends. Birders enter when, where, and how they went birding, and then fill out a checklist of all the birds seen and heard during the outing.”

Boundaries of the HB Urban Forest survey are: HB Central Park Dog Park and equestrian stables to the north, Edward’s to the east, Ellis Avenue to the south and Goldenwest Street to the west. Bird reports are submitted by lead birder Lena Hayashi.


The HB Tree Society’s first-ever HB Urban Forest BIRD-A-THON Sept. 22-25, 2022, gave wing to fun, funding and awareness of the conservation momentum underway at the HB Urban Forest. For details, please click here.

NOVEMBER BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Hummingbird

The top photo and the other two Allen’s Hummingbirds on the left, as well as the two Anna’s Hummingbirds on the right, are both plentiful year-round residents in the Urban Forest.  Photos compliments of James Kendall

Each day throughout the year, observant visitors to the Urban Forest and its surrounding gardens are treated to the fascinating spectacle of tiny dynamic aerialists that suddenly appear as hovering iridescent jewels as they dart from blossom to blossom, urgently seeking and sipping life-sustaining nectar.

Two species of hummingbirds make this park their year-round home. The Anna’s Hummingbird is recognized by its flash of shimmering magenta at the gorget/throat and forehead contrasting with its shiny green body. That flash of magenta/red and green are unmistakable field marks of the male Anna’s.

Allen’s Hummingbirds present as coppery rufous and green overall. Adult males have a coppery rufous-brown tail, eye patch, and belly that contrasts with their bronze-green back and deep reddish, golden-orange shimmering gorget. The startling jewel-like flash of color at the throat relies on capturing rays of sunlight in order to display its vibrant visual magic. Adult male of the species command this alluring attention-capturing display capacity. The drabber female is in fact the sole intended audience of his vivacious choreographed presentation that artfully combines rapid aerial feats with a vibrantly colorful light show and burst of sound.

Once successfully courted, the female constructs her ingenious tiny cup nest from resilient spider-silk, lichen and leaf matter, a stretchy thimble-like cradle to protect two coffee bean-shaped and -sized white eggs. She will diligently incubate for two weeks before hatching, then nurse the growing nestlings with nectar and insects for three weeks more before they fledge the nest and forage on their own.

Due to our mild coastal climate, Anna’s and Allen’s Hummingbirds can continuously breed year-round in our local parks and yards. Watch for this fascinating spectacle of nature as they busily thrive amidst our flowering trees, bushes and flowering plants cycling throughout the seasons. These airborne jewels act as highly efficient and key essential pollinators as they hover, sip nectar and then zip rapidly from blossom to blossom in this reciprocally beneficial cycle of life.

Urban Forest Monthly Survey
November 24, 2022
32 species, 259 individuals observed

Thanksgiving Day and this marks the third anniversary of bird surveys at the Urban Forest! 

It started as a beautiful, calm, and sunny morning with temperatures in the 60s. Betty Kanne, the spark that initiated these surveys, as usual was kind enough to record the eBird list and Jim Kendall came with his camera. Jim has captured countless wonderful photos documenting the birds of the Urban Forest since the very first survey in 2020.  We were so happy to have Mark Johnston, a near-by resident of the Urban Forest and excellent birder, return for the count today.  Lastly, Joshua Joun, who rushed to catch up with us, completed the group adding his infectious enthusiasm for birding on this anniversary day.

The Santa Ana winds probably limited the number of species but not until we had time to leisurely enjoy walking and appreciating the labor of love from the many volunteers who have and continue to create this magical Urban Forest.

Observations

  1. Number observed: 4
  2. Number observed: 3
  3. Number observed: 3
  4. Number observed: 4
  5. Number observed: 3
  6. Number observed: 2
  7. Number observed: 1
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 2
  10. Number observed: 6
    Black Phoebe - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  11. Number observed: 2
  12. Number observed: 1
  13. Number observed: 1
  14. Number observed: 6
  15. Number observed: 6
  16. Number observed: 4
  17. Number observed: 2
  18. Number observed: 1
  19. Number observed: 2
  20. Number observed: 3
    Hermit Thrush - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Hermit Thrush - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  21. Number observed: 2
  22. Number observed: 70
    Cedar Waxwing - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Cedar Waxwing - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Cedar Waxwing - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  23. Number observed: 2
  24. Number observed: 35
  25. Number observed: 5
  26. Number observed: 2
    American Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  27. Number observed: 12
    White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  28. Number observed: 2
  29. Number observed: 45
    Western Meadowlark - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Western Meadowlark - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  30. Number observed: 1
  31. Number observed: 3
  32. Yellow-rumped Warbler

    Number observed: 23

OCTOBER BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Cooper’s Hawk

This fierce, locally common raptor is known by many different names throughout North America, including the chicken hawk, striker, and flying cross. It is a crow-sized hawk. It is often identified by its proportionally large flat head, long and banded tail feathers, and fierce hunting habits under the canopy of wooded forests where they use their remarkable speed and agility to stalk and ambush elusive prey species. Their long tails act as rudders that allow them to be extremely maneuverable in wooded areas as they careen adroitly through the forest, hunting birds on the wing. While they mainly eat smaller birds, they can also prey on small mammals, including squirrels. The Cooper’s Hawk is a resident, breeding bird that has adapted to flourish in city parks and tree-lined streets with attractively landscaped neighborhoods. Here, it can remain well-concealed in foliage before bursting forth to rapidly seize its favored, unwitting prey of dove-sized birds. Accordingly, a well-stocked backyard bird feeder can unintentionally serve to provide an avian buffet to this keenly vigilant and highly efficient bird of prey. Notice the yellow eyes of the juvenile, and red eyes of the adult Cooper’s Hawks.                                        Photos by James Kendall

Urban Forest Monthly Survey
October 27, 2022
34 species, 434 individuals observed

It was a beautiful day. Sunny, clear, and calm with temperatures in the mid 60’s to begin and 70 at the end!  Surveyors this morning were Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne (eBirder), Ellen Tipping, Jim Kendall, Dave and Sharon Telford, and welcomed Cheryl Searcy, a first timer at UF. 

         The highlight was the Western Meadowlarks in the open field as we began our survey.  It was exciting to see their return as a few of them landed in the large open field and disappeared, even though they are bright yellow and black.  The pattern on their bodies and reflection from the light camouflage them instantly when they land. As we watched them on the ground, we counted several more meadowlarks.  But, a few minutes later, when something startled them, we counted 50 in the air, a lot more than we detected on the ground!  Such is the fun of birding.

          While surveying, we were able to take time to review and study the various sounds and song of the White-crowned Sparrows and listen to resident Song Sparrows practice their songs.  Winter sounds of Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Say’s Phoebes, and of course, Yellow-rumped Warblers filled the air.

We look forward to more winter residents returning to the Urban Forest.

  1. Number observed: 25
  2. Number observed: 4
  3. Number observed: 4
  4. Number observed: 16
    Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  5. Number observed: 1
  6. Number observed: 2
  7. Number observed: 1
  8. Number observed: 4
  9. Number observed: 1
  10. Number observed: 1
  11. Number observed: 6
  12. Number observed: 3
    Say's Phoebe - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Say's Phoebe - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  13. Number observed: 30
  14. Number observed: 39
  15. Number observed: 22
  16. Number observed: 6
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  17. Number observed: 3
  18. Number observed: 4
  19. Number observed: 4
  20. Number observed: 3
  21. Number observed: 4
  22. Number observed: 80
    House Finch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    House Finch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  23. Number observed: 3
    Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  24. Number observed: 2
  25. Number observed: 30
    White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  26. Number observed: 10
  27. Number observed: 5
  28. Number observed: 2
  29. Number observed: 50
  30. Number observed: 30
    Red-winged Blackbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Red-winged Blackbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Red-winged Blackbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  31. Number observed: 4
    Brown-headed Cowbird - James Kendall

     

SEPTEMBER BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Hermit Thrush

Fall birding means the welcome return of the secretive Hermit Thrush that revels in its own company diligently rummaging through the leaf litter and forest under-story in search of spiders, ants, earthworms, and insects of all varieties. A favorite winter food includes the red berries fallen from our abundant native Toyon bushes and other fruit bearing winter shrubs. Although favoring the dark, shadowy areas under bushes and trees, listen attentively for its loud, abrupt “TCHUP!” call, revealing its presence only a few feet away! Once there, you’ll behold this ground-foraging small brown bird with a thin dark bill standing out as it nervously flicks its wings and contrasting reddish-brown tail that lifts up-and-down confirming its identification even before revealing its heavily spotted breast. A beady black eye, narrowly ringed in white contributes to a startlingly distinctive appearance. Enjoy this diligent hermit as it over-winters with us and before the springtime draws it to northern, higher elevations for spring/summer breeding.

September 22, 2022, & BIRD-A-THON Observations

41 species observed, 315 individuals

Team Lena’s Legion kicked off the first Urban Forest Bird-A-Thon this morning.  It was a beautiful day. Sunny, clear, and calm with temperatures in the mid 70’s and NOT HUMID!  Lena’s army of wonderfully talented, fun-loving, and talkative birders included Betty Kanne, Ellen Tipping, Jim Kendall, Jim Currie, Brenda Sabin, Debra Gala, Claire Grozinger, Pema Zonglo, and Josh Joun.  Everyone had a great time scanning the sky, trees, and shrubs calling out birds and directing others to see them. Kudos to Ellen who always had a kind smile and nod as she skillfully and accurately recorded the species and numbers on eBird as 9 of us called out sightings.

          41 species were seen, thanks to Josh and Pema who saw a Say’s Phoebe on their way out of the Urban Forest, and a total of 312 birds were counted.  Today we welcomed back some of our winter residents: Say’s Phoebe, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Hermit Thrush, Townsend’s Warbler, Savannah Sparrow, and White-crowned Sparrows. 

         Our Sept. 22-25 BIRD-A-THON goal has been to raise money for the Urban Forest to provide more native habitats, especially with California Sagebrush, Artemisia californica, to entice the endangered California Gnatcatcher to reside in the Urban Forest. 

  1. Number observed: 34
  2. Number observed: 20
  3. Number observed: 10
  4. Number observed: 10
    Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  5. Number observed: 1
  6. Number observed: 1
  7. Number observed: 1
  8. Number observed: 2
  9. Number observed: 1
    Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  10. Number observed: 1
  11. Number observed: 1
  12. Number observed: 2
  13. Number observed: 1
    Western Wood-Pewee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Librar
  14. Number observed: 3
  15. Number observed: 6
    Black Phoebe - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Black Phoebe - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  16. Number observed: 1
    Warbling Vireo - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  17. Number observed: 28
  18. Number observed: 13
    Bushtit - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  19. Number observed: 10
  20. Number observed: 3
  21. Number observed: 6
    House Wren - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  22. Number observed: 3
    Western Bluebird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  23. Number observed: 1
  24. Number observed: 3
  25. Number observed: 2
    House Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  26. Number observed: 97
    House Finch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  27. Number observed: 13
    Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  28. Number observed: 5
  29. Number observed: 1
  30. Number observed: 1
  31. Number observed: 2
  32. Number observed: 7
  33. Number observed: 8
    California Towhee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    California Towhee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  34. Number observed: 2
  35. Number observed: 3
    Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  36. Number observed: 6
  37. Number observed: 1
  38. Number observed: 1
  39. Number observed: 2
  40. Number observed: 2
    Western Tanager - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library

AUGUST BIRD OF THE MONTH:
California Towhee

Did you hear that? …. Wait! I hear it again. That abrupt, sharp metallic TINK!
That’s the “calling”-card announcement of the California Towhee!

Peer down into the leaf-litter and you’ll see this largish, 9”, dusty-brown, long-tailed bird eagerly shuffling through the ground cover looking for grubs, or briefly perched in nearby bushes. Its drab gray/brown appearance is nicely offset by a rusty/orange patch under-tail and surrounding a thick darkish bill. This successful breeder in our local tree-filled parks will likely have its similar looking mate quite close by, listening intently for that identifying TINK! call and ready to respond. Photos by James Kendall

On a sunny, humid morning with temperatures in the 70s, Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne (eBirder), Claire Grozinger, Jim Kendall, Dave and Sharon Telford, and Josh Joun counted all the birds we could hear and see for two hours. 

Early on and throughout the morning, we watched flocks of Red-necked Phalaropes fly across the Urban Forest from Lake Huntington to Bolsa Chica. The birds were mostly quiet except for the House Finches, Swinhoe’s White-eyes, and Lesser Goldfinches.  There was a snippet of a song from a House Wren but the other birds only called occasionally.

While under the cool canopy of the Urban Forest, we also discussed our Team name for the BIRD-A-THON weekend coming up for next month to herald the beginning of fall migration.  We are hoping to come up with a fun and catchy name.  Our survey group will kick off the event on Thursday, September 22, at 8:00 a.m.  Our survey will be one week earlier than our usual last Thursday of the month.  Our goal is to raise money for the Urban Forest and to provide more native habitats, especially with California Sagebrush, Artemisia Californica, to entice the endangered California Gnatcatcher to reside in the Urban Forest.  If you can’t join us, please consider a team of your own.  You can bird anytime and any day from Thursday, September 22 to Sunday, September 25, alone, with children, your dog, friends, or family.  Make it a fun event.  Check out the webpage https://hbtrees.org/hb-urban-forest-bird-a-thon/ for more information.  We would appreciate a donation of any amount and all donations are tax deductible.  TAX ID: EIN 33-0815267

Thanks so much!  Enjoy the list and photos below. – Lena Hayashi

August 25, 2022 Observations

34 species , 335 individuals observed

  1. Number observed: 2
  2. Number observed: 1
  3. Number observed: 2
  4. Number observed: 3
  5. Number observed: 7
    Anna's Hummingbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  6. Number observed: 23
  7. Number observed: 120
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 1
  10. Number observed: 1
  11. Number observed: 1
    Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
  12. Number observed: 1
  13. woodpecker sp.

    Number observed: 1
  14. Number observed: 2
    American Kestrel - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    American Kestrel - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  15. Number observed: 2
    Pacific-slope Flycatcher - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  16. Number observed: 6
  17. Number observed: 1
  18. Number observed: 11
  19. Number observed: 1
  20. Number observed: 1
  21. Number observed: 4
  22. Number observed: 25
    Swinhoe's White-eye - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  23. Number observed: 5
  24. Number observed: 1
  25. Number observed: 2
  26. Number observed: 66
    House Finch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  27. Number observed: 25
    Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  28. Number observed: 1
  29. Number observed: 5
    Song Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  30. Number observed: 6
    California Towhee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  31. Number observed: 1
  32. Number observed: 3
  33. Number observed: 2

_________________________________________________________________

JULY BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Bushtit!

Bottom left is the light-eyed female, and bottom right is the dark-eyed male. At top right, notice the unusual hanging nest that these inconspicuous yet common birds weave.

Bushtits are tiny, long-tailed gray birds that travel in large busy flocks, relentlessly rocketing from one leafy bush or tree to the next, all while keeping up a contestant rapid twittering in order to keep the gang in active motion. These dynamic acrobats often hang upside down as they rapidly glean insects from leafy shrubbery. A careful observation of these frenetically moving dynamos, will disclose that the males have dark eyes whereas the female has a pale yellowish eye providing stark contrast to its tiny gray body.

Bushtits are common year-round inhabitants of urban parks and neighborhoods throughout the West and Southwest. Watch and listen for these diminutive dynamos as they sweep through your own backyard!

July 28, 2022, Observations
29 species, 299 individuals observed 

  1. Number observed: 10
  2. Number observed: 28
  3. Number observed: 2
  4. Number observed: 5
  5. Number observed: 5
  6. Number observed: 20
    Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Allen's Hummingbird - Joshua Joun
    © Joshua Joun Macaulay Library
  7. Number observed: 1
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 2
    Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  10. Number observed: 2
  11. Empidonax sp.

    Number observed: 1
  12. Number observed: 6
  13. Number observed: 1
    Ash-throated Flycatcher - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    Ash-throated Flycatcher - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Ash-throated Flycatcher - Joshua Joun
    © Joshua Joun Macaulay Library
  14. Number observed: 2
    Hutton's Vireo - Joshua Joun
    © Joshua Joun Macaulay Library
  15. Number observed: 16
  16. Number observed: 2
  17. Number observed: 1
  18. Number observed: 44
    Bushtit - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Bushtit - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  19. Number observed: 25
  20. Number observed: 6
    House Wren - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  21. Number observed: 2
  22. Number observed: 1
    Pin-tailed Whydah - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Pin-tailed Whydah - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Librar
  23. Number observed: 100
  24. Number observed: 2
  25. Number observed: 3
  26. Number observed: 2
  27. Number observed: 2
    Hooded Oriole - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  28. Number observed: 5
    Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  29. Common Yellowthroat

    _________________________________________________________________

JUNE BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Western Bluebird

HB Tree Society names the Western Bluebird
as official mascot & spokesbird of the Urban Forest!

The Western Bluebird was selected because it’s a perfect representative for the Urban Forest. Both entities manifest hope, resilience and renewal in the face of myriad challenges to our natural environment. 

The Western Bluebird came close to entirely disappearing in Orange County in the last century due to destruction of its needed forested environment that was being rapidly urbanized without essential mitigation. An association of concerned birders arose 30 years ago to place customized nest boxes in key parks across the county providing a lifeline for a beloved species on the edge of disappearance in our urban areas. The Southern California Bluebird Club continues this focused mission throughout the southland to great success (see also: socalbluebirds.org).

Likewise, the Urban Forest rose from tiny seedlings planted a mere 20 years ago into a maturing, towering forest in a lush, vibrant environment providing ideal nesting opportunities for the vulnerable Western Bluebird. The Western Bluebird thrives in this forested habitat offering natural crevices for nesting as well as abundant food sources. Urban Forest volunteers supplement tree crevices with customized nest boxes perfectly designed for Western Bluebirds’ breeding success.

     Read more about the Western Bluebird and its new spokesbird status by clicking here.

June 30, 2022, Observations
33 species, 218 individuals observed 

It was a beautiful sunny, clear, and calm morning, rising to 72 or so degrees.  Surveyors were only four – Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne (eBirder), Sharon, and Dave Telford.  Summer months are typically slow and quiet as breeding season winds down and fledglings depend less on their parents to feed them. 

          One Spotted Towhee continued to sing all morning in and around the corralled area as did several House Wrens.  It was interesting to watch how family groups of Orange-crowned Warblers, Hutton’s Vireos, Bushtits, Swinhoe’s White-eyes, and House Finches kept in close contact with each other. We watched adults trying to teach their young to feed themselves and what looked like siblings just having fun chasing each other. An experience to remember was watching the antics of four Hutton’s Vireos dart about the branches, seemingly chasing each other, almost climbing onto each other, and settling still on the ground to bask in the sun or preen.

          Urban Forest volunteers Phil and Robyn came by with their dog and told us which two House Wren and two Western Bluebird boxes were still active. We dutifully checked them out and were rewarded with activity in or around the boxes.  Without the boxes the volunteers put up, there would not be the success rate of cavity nesting birds in the Urban Forest. We thank and appreciate them.

  1. Egyptian Goose

    Number observed: 1

  2. Number observed: 1
  3. Number observed: 22
  4. Number observed: 1
  5. Number observed: 3
  6. Number observed: 4
  7. Number observed: 11
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 4
  10. Number observed: 2
  11. Number observed: 1
  12. Number observed: 1
  13. Number observed: 1
  14. Number observed: 1
  15. Number observed: 2
  16. Number observed: 2
  17. Number observed: 4
  18. Number observed: 12
  19. Number observed: 8
  20. Number observed: 1
  21. Number observed: 31
  22. Number observed: 9
  23. Number observed: 7
  24. Number observed: 5
  25. Number observed: 58
  26. Number observed: 7
  27. Number observed: 2
  28. Number observed: 4
  29. Number observed: 1
  30. Number observed: 2
  31. Number observed: 1
  32. Number observed: 4

MAY BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Goldfinch!
(There’s Gold in them there trees!)

Look-up and be astounded by the beauty of these dynamic songsters as they rapidly flit among the trees, often in the upper canopy and quite often in mixed groups. Active and gregarious they flourish in the company of red-tinged, brown striped House Finches with which they share the characteristic, cone-shaped FINCH bill, so perfectly adapted to crack and eat seeds of many sizes. If you have a back-yard bird feeder, you’ll easily recognize them as familiar friends with a penchant for sunflower and shiny black Nyjer seeds. Springtime brings out the best in these flashy yellow and black acrobats. Male goldfinch transform from a duller winter aspect into their flashy yellow breeding plumage. Females brighten up as well, but keep a toned down look to conceal themselves as they dutifully sit on nests and feed chicks. A male American Goldfinch in breeding plumage is a real showstopper. His bright yellow body, back and face are nicely set off by a spiffy black cap and wings. The male Lesser Goldfinch shows off a bright yellow body but with a dark back and full size black hat. His shiny black wings show a bigger splash of white by way of sharp contrast. Winter, non-breeding males and females, on the other hand, don’t immediately draw your attention. They’re more of a smudgy brown and mustard color, with striped black and white wings. So enjoy the dazzling sunflower yellow of these social dynamos as they dash from tree to bush and back again all spring and summer.

May 26, 2022, Observations
33 species, 232 individuals observed 

It was a beautiful, clear, and calm morning with the temperature in the 60’s.  The sun came out by the time we reached the top of the hill. Surveyors were Lena Hayashi, Dave and Sharon Telford, Jim Kendall, Rick Shearer, and Betty Kanne, who kindly did the eBird list.

          Spring is magical!  The plants and trees seem twice as large and beautiful as they were last month!  The overwhelming songs for the morning were from the House Wrens and their bubbling rapid and musical trills and rattles, could be seen and heard everywhere.  We had fun watching a juvenile perched on a cut log and chirping with its yellowish gape, as it waited for its parent to return with insects. 

          Other vocal birds were the Song Sparrow, Spotted Towhee, Lesser Goldfinches, Swinhole’s White-eyes, and House Finches.  Hummingbirds were also active and enjoying all the nectar available from the bounty and variety of blooming flowers.

  1. Number observed: 8
  2. Number observed: 2
  3. Number observed: 2
  4. Number observed: 4
  5. Number observed: 4
  6. Number observed: 20
  7. Number observed: 4
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 1
    Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  10. Number observed: 1
  11. Number observed: 1
    American Kestrel - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    American Kestrel - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  12. Number observed: 1
  13. Number observed: 3
    Pacific-slope Flycatcher - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  14. Number observed: 5
  15. Number observed: 2
  16. Number observed: 2
    Hutton's Vireo - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Hutton's Vireo - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Librar
  17. Number observed: 1
  18. Number observed: 5
  19. Number observed: 4
  20. Number observed: 20
  21. Number observed: 6
  22. Number observed: 22
    House Wren - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    House Wren - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    House Wren - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  23. Number observed: 5
  24. Number observed: 1
  25. Number observed: 60
  26. Number observed: 20
    Lesser Goldfinch - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  27. Number observed: 1
  28. Number observed: 13
  29. Number observed: 6
    California Towhee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  30. Number observed: 2
  31. Number observed: 2
  32. Number observed: 2

APRIL BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Orange-crowned Warbler

Orange-crowned Warblers are small, active song birds characterized by their rapid flitting movement through foliage and their memorable songs in springtime. The sprightly, diminutive Orange-crowned Warbler is a subdued yellow with the added surprise of orange feathers occasionally flashed on its crown when surprised or agitated. While many more strikingly colored warblers briefly migrate through Orange County on their way to northern spring breeding grounds or when returning south for warmer overwintering destinations, many Orange-crowned Warblers are local breeders, building their nests here to raise their young in our own tree-filled parks and backyards. Listen for the distinctive high-pitched staccato trill of the male this spring as he attracts a potential mate. – Photos by James Kendall

April 28, 2022, Observations
33 species, 189 individuals observed 

It was a cool, drizzly morning with the temperature in the 60’s.  Our group was small this morning with Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne (who was kind enough to eBird), Ellen Tipping, Jim Kendall, and Rick Shearer.

          We were expecting a nice spring count of birds but the cold, wet weather, kept the variety and numbers quiet or away from the Urban Forest. Many singing House Wrens and displaying Hummingbirds were seen and counted as they were last month. A vocal Spotted Towhee, probably the same one that confused us last month, repeated a down slurred note periodically in between his “pweee” song.  Last month he repeated a “whit-like” call, as a flycatcher would do.  This one bird has fooled us two months in a row. Neither of the two sounds were found in any recorded sounds we had for Spotted Towhees. A good lesson in the field.

          We marveled at the transformation of the creek area where the crossing bridge is planned. The plants and artistic placements of rocks, following the row of Sycamore trees, will become a favored path to stroll through in the future. Thanks to all the dedicated and hard-working volunteers. You are all very much appreciated. We also noticed additional bird boxes and hope for cavity nesters, other than House Wrens, to use them this spring!

1. Canada Goose

Number observed: 6

2. Mallard

Number observed: 5

3. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)

Number observed: 1

4. Mourning Dove

Number observed: 4

5. Anna’s Hummingbird

Number observed: 3

6. Allen’s Hummingbird

Number observed: 17

7.  Killdeer

Number observed: 2

8. Double-crested Cormorant

Number observed: 1

9. Great Egret

Number observed: 1

10.  Turkey Vulture

Number observed: 2

11. Black Phoebe

Number observed: 3

12.  Say’s Phoebe

Number observed: 1

13. Cassin’s Kingbird

Number observed: 4

14. American Crow

Number observed: 17

15. Common Raven

Number observed: 2

16. Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Number observed: 3

17. Barn Swallow

Number observed: 9

Barn Swallow - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

18.  Bushtit

Number observed: 7

19. House Wren

Number observed: 9

20. Northern Mockingbird

Number observed: 1

21. Western Bluebird

Number observed: 5

22. American Robin

Number observed: 1

23. Scaly-breasted Munia

Number observed: 4

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

24. House Finch

Number observed: 26

25. Lesser Goldfinch

Number observed: 13

26.  American Goldfinch

Number observed: 4

27. Song Sparrow

Number observed: 5

28.  California Towhee

Number observed: 9

California Towhee - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

29.  Hooded Oriole

Number observed: 2

30. Bullock’s Oriole

Number observed: 1

31. Orange-crowned Warbler

Number observed: 5

32. Common Yellowthroat

Number observed: 2

33. Western Tanager

Number observed: 3

_________________________________________________________________

MARCH BIRD OF THE MONTH:
American Kestrel, Falcon extraordinaire

The American Kestrel is our smallest, most abundant, and most vibrantly colorful Falcon. You‘ll notice our pair of year-round resident Kestrels perched on posts in the hilltop preserved Raptor Foraging Area, surveying the field for grasshoppers, lizards, and small rodents comprising their customary prey.  The more colorful male has a solid rusty back & tail with a wide black tip and contrasting blue-gray wings. Both male and female of these fiercely striking Birds of Prey sport two distinctive dark vertical face stripes.  Watch for their dramatic aerial show of slow hovering mid-air facing into the wind, flapping and adjusting their long tails to stay in place before rapidly diving to seize unwitting prey in their powerful talons. – Photos by James Kendall

March 31, 2022, Observations
37 species, 315 individuals observed 

It was a cool, calm, and overcast day with the temperature in the 60’s. Our group was small this morning with Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne (who was kind enough to eBird), Ellen Tipping, Jim Stacy, Nancy Kappelmann, and Rick Shearer.

The House Wrens were numerous and singing up a storm with one seen carrying nesting material. A vocal Spotted Towhee repeated one note of his trill, followed by extended seconds of silence. We thought we were hearing “whit-like” calls, as a flycatcher would do. Finally, the bird popped up and we all watched the Spotted Towhee make the repeated single note vocalizations. A good lesson in the field.The hummingbirds were abundant and displaying throughout the beautiful blooming gardens of the Urban Forest. Brewers Blackbirds are now regulars in the horse stables along with the Rock Pigeons.

During our three-hour survey, we all marveled at the artistic placements of rocks, benches, tree stumps, and wood carvings surrounded by colorful, blooming plants that provide so many resting and viewing areas throughout the Urban Forest. Our compliments to all the dedicated and hard-working volunteers. You are all very much appreciated. We also noticed additional bird boxes and hope for cavity nesters to use them this spring! – Lena Hayash

  1. Number observed: 18
  2. Number observed: 12
  3. Number observed: 6
  4. Number observed: 2
  5. Number observed: 20
  6. Number observed: 1
  7. Number observed: 1
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 2
  10. Number observed: 2
    Downy Woodpecker - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

_________________________________________________________________

FEBRUARY BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Spotted Towhee, Year-round resident

This flashy year-round resident presents itself frequently at the ground level performing its “double-scratch” foraging technique as it hops quickly forward and backward searching for seeds and insects in the leaf litter. I’m most attracted by its large size, suddenly darting out of ground cover ahead of you on a footpath for an instant before diving back into the brush, momentarily flashing black, white and chestnut color…and yes, if you’re lucky, a bright red eye. Springtime singing males may perch openly atop shrubs singing its striking whistled, then buzzy song. Look, listen and be astonished.  – Photos by James Kendall

February 24, 2022, Observations
39 species, 283 individuals observed 

    It was very cold, but the morning was beautiful, clear, calm, and sunny, with snow-capped mountains in the distance. Temperatures ranged from 45 degrees to low 60s.  Surveyors were Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne (eBird), Dave and Sharon Telford, Jim Kendall, Ellen Tipping, Barbara Wasbin and Laura K.

          Laura is one of the many hard-working volunteers at the Urban Forest.  She, Phil, and Robin have designed, built, and placed nesting boxes throughout the Urban Forest. Last year, Western Bluebirds and House Wrens took advantage of them and Laura is looking forward to attracting additional species in the coming years. It was a pleasure to have her join us and hear about all the things going on at the Urban Forest and to also have her experience how we go about counting birds here each month.

          We spotted a Golden-crowned Sparrow among about 30 White-crowns and two Fox Sparrows in the dense understory of a bush.  What a pleasure it is to be among fellow birders who love to spend the time to get good looks at birds and study their field marks and behavior.  It makes learning so enjoyable and easy.

          Enjoy the list below!

  1. Number observed: 4
  2. Number observed: 5
  3. Number observed: 7

    Anna’s Hummingbird © James Kendall Macaulay Library

  4. Number observed: 11
  5. Rufous/Allen’s Hummingbird

    Number observed: 2
  6. Number observed: 1
  7. gull sp.

    Number observed: 8
  8. Number observed: 6
  9. Number observed: 3

    Red-tailed Hawk© James Kendall Macaulay Library

  10. Number observed: 1
  11. Number observed: 3
  12. Number observed: 4
  13. Number observed: 2
  14. Number observed: 12
  15. Number observed: 3
  16. Number observed: 25
  17. Number observed: 3
  18. Number observed: 3
  19. Number observed: 2
  20. Number observed: 4
  21. Number observed: 4
  22. Number observed: 6
  23. Number observed: 1
  24. Number observed: 1
  25. Number observed: 20
  26. Number observed: 10
  27. Number observed: 2
  28. Number observed: 41
  29. Number observed: 1
    Golden-crowned Sparrow - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    Golden-crowned Sparrow - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
  30. Number observed: 10
  31. Number observed: 4
  32. Number observed: 2
  33. Number observed: 14
  34. Number observed: 33
  35. Number observed: 4
  36. Number observed: 3
  37. Number observed: 5
  38. Yellow-rumped Warbler

    Number observed: 13

    Peregrine Falcon

    Number observed: 1

_________________________________________________________________

JANUARY BIRD OF THE MONTH:
White-crowned Sparrow

A most welcome and delightful winter resident! Our parks and yards spring to life in the fall with the sights and sounds of the returning White-crowned Sparrows. These sprightly beauties sing out their clear whistling, cadenced tune while gathering in small flocks to forage on the ground or in low shrubs. 

Like most sparrows these active, distinctively recognizable birds are thick-billed seed eaters and eagerly partake of the bounty of fall and winter seeding vegetation and backyard feeders. The adult birds sport very sharp looking black and white crown stripes, whereas their summer offspring retain chestnut and gray crown stripes until their spring departure. Watch and listen for these lively, energetic songbirds in your own yard and nearby parks. Enjoy their sprightly presence now, before their departure on the annual long flight to northern breeding grounds, typically starting the first week of May. – Photos by James Kendall

January 27, 2022, Observations
34 species, 250 individuals observed 

   It was a beautiful, clear, calm, and sunny day.  Temperatures ranged from low 50s to mid 60s.  Surveyors were Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne, Dave and Sharon Telford, Jim Kendall, Jim Currie, Ellen Tipping, Clair Grozinger, Nancy Kapplemann, Maureen Myers, and Rick Shearer.

          Eleven of us started out together and split up at times to survey the beautiful grounds of the Urban Forest.  The usual suspects were seen for this time of year with a wintering Hermit Thrush sighted, White-crowned Sparrows, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and Yellow-rumped Warblers.  It felt life a cool spring day but hopefully there will be more rainy days in February and the coming months.

  1. Number observed: 1
  2. Number observed: 5
  3. Number observed: 1
  4. Number observed: 1
  5. Number observed: 11
  6. Number observed: 9
    Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  7. hummingbird sp.

    Number observed: 2
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. gull sp.

    Number observed: 15
  10. Number observed: 1
  11. Number observed: 1
  12. Number observed: 1
    Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
    Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  13. Number observed: 3
    Northern Flicker - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Northern Flicker - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  14. Number observed: 2
    American Kestrel - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    American Kestrel - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    American Kestrel - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Libra
  15. Number observed: 7
    Black Phoebe - Lena Hayashi
    © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
  16. Number observed: 2
  17. Number observed: 17
  18. Number observed: 2
  19. Number observed: 48
  20. Number observed: 4
  21. Number observed: 4
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  22. Number observed: 3
  23. Number observed: 3
    Western Bluebird - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  24. Number observed: 22
  25. Number observed: 9
  26. Number observed: 4
  27. Number observed: 31
  28. Number observed: 4
  29. Number observed: 4
  30. Number observed: 5
    Spotted Towhee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
    Spotted Towhee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  31. Number observed: 6
  32. Number observed: 3
  33. Number observed: 2
  34. Number observed: 1
  35. Number observed: 2
  36. _________________________________________________________________

December 25, 2021, Observations
38 species observed, 372 individuals

Our thanks to Steve Morris for doing the Christmas bird count. The birders led by Lena Hayashi will return for the next count on Jan. 27, 2022.
Number observed: 25
Number observed: 10
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 5
Number observed: 2

Rufous/Allen’s Hummingbird

Number observed: 4
Number observed: 25
Number observed: 5
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 50
Number observed: 10
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 9
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 40
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 64
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 24
Number observed: 40
Number observed: 1

___________________________________________________________________

November 2021 Observations
(Thanksgiving & the day after!)

29 species observed, 274 individuals

          Because the wind blew all night and by morning, it was a quandary to decide if the survey was a go or not.  Brave souls Jim Kendall and Dave Telford ventured out to check conditions.  Though they reported back that the wind was fierce, and we had decided to postpone the survey until Friday, Jim and Dave continued to bird for over two hours! 

          On Friday, Jim and Dave returned along with Lena Hayashi, Sharon Telford, Betty Kanne, Sandy Smith and Rick Shearer.  The lists are interesting to study.  It seems 110 Western Meadowlarks decided to hunker down together in the field on the windy day but only 6 were seen the next day, at around the same time in the morning.  Though 11 more species were seen on the calm day, there were 6 different species seen on the windy day.  The total number of species counted at UF on the two days was 35!

          It is always gratifying, but especially on holidays, when wonderful people come out to count birds and work the soil at the Urban Forest. The data collected from this citizen science activity will benefit the birds, wildlife, and the habitat.  What a gift for future generations to explore and enjoy nature!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Cedar Waxwings, a welcome wintertime spectacle

The ripening of red winter berries coincides with the arrival of large flocks of these dazzling beauties. Elegant Cedar Waxwings sport a rakish black mask and sleek pointed crest plus silky beige plumage tipped in waxy red and yellow. Listen for the high-pitched, trilled whistle as dozens descend from the treetops to feast on the festive red berries of the California native Toyon bush so very plentiful in the Urban Forest and throughout Huntington Central Park. It is an unforgettable wintertime spectacle.

Cedar Waxwings, spied by birders observing in the Urban Forest on Nov. 26, 2021, and photographed by James Kendall.

  1. Number observed: 1
  2. Number observed: 6
  3. Number observed: 6
  4. Number observed: 1
    Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  5. Number observed: 2
    American Kestrel photos by © James Kendall Macaulay LibraryAmerican Kestrel - James Kendall American Kestrel - James Kendall
    American Kestrel - James Kendall American Kestrel - James Kendall
  6. Number observed: 1
  7. Number observed: 7
    Black Phoebe - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 1
  10. Number observed: 45
  11. Number observed: 16
  12. Number observed: 3
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  13. Number observed: 1
  14. Number observed: 4
  15. Number observed: 1
  16. Number observed: 5
  17. Number observed: 50
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  18. Number observed: 23
  19. Number observed: 2
  20. Number observed: 10
    American Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  21. Number observed: 51
    White-crowned Sparrow, photos © James Kendall Macaulay LibraryWhite-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
  22. Number observed: 1
    Golden-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  23. Number observed: 8
    Song Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  24. Number observed: 3
    California Towhee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  25. Number observed: 1
  26. Number observed: 6
  27. Number observed: 2
  28. Number observed: 2
  29. Number observed: 14
    Yellow-rumped Warbler - James Kendall

___________________________________________________________________

October 28. 2021 Survey Results

Savannah Sparrow, American Kestrel and Lesser Goldfinch, photographed during the October survey in the Urban Forest. © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Lena Hayashi, Jim Kendall, Dave and Sharon Telford, Betty Kanne, Jim Currie, Barbara Wasbin, and Nancy Kappelmann counted the UF birds on this clear, calm, sunny but cool, and beautiful day–60 degrees to start and a comfortable 73 degrees at the end.  Monday’s rain added much-needed moisture to the dry fields and washed dust off the trees and bushes.  A highlight was seeing two female American Kestrels, shown below.  One was banded and probably the same one we saw earlier in the year.

As surveyors, we contribute to the science and knowledge of birds. At the same time, we enjoy the experience of learning and teaching each other new skills.  As the seasons change, so do the appearances of the birds.  Today, we heard both the American and Lesser Goldfinches.  They were in the same Sycamore tree.  To get an accurate count, the challenge was to look at each one and be able to identify each species.  Some males were fairly easy, but there were some complicated “tweeners” transitioning to winter plumage, that shared similar field marks.  We had a great time trying to decide which was what!  It is so much fun to have a group of birders who enjoy getting together each month to participate in citizen science, try to do a good job, and keep our minds sharp.  So what if we make mistakes and next year we forget and have to learn it again?  That’s part of the fun friends have together.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Western Meadowlarks, field foragers

The Western Meadowlark is a beautiful, medium-sized bird that gathers in sizable flocks on the dry grassy fields surrounding the Urban Forest each winter. They arrive in October from their spring/summer breeding grounds and find strength and safety in numbers on the hilltop area as they collectively feed on insects and seeds at the ground level. The striking yellow and black underside plumage is very well camouflaged as they feed low in the field due to wing and back feathers perfectly colored to blend in with the brown, beige and tan grasses of the winter field. It takes a patient and attentive eye to survey the field and notice the presence of the flock due to this deceptive coloration. Yet, the astute observer will be rewarded when the whole flock is suddenly flushed into the air, revealing the bright yellow undersides and black necklace along with a flash of white at the edges of the tail. It’s a joy to see and well worth the wait.

October 2021 Observations

32 species observed, 446 individuals

Number observed: 20
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 12
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
White-tailed Kite - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2
American Kestrel - Lena Hayashi

American Kestrel, © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

American Kestrel - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 3
Say's Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Cassin's Kingbird - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 27
Number observed: 1
Horned Lark - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Horned Lark - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 15

Number observed: 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - James KendallRuby-crowned Kinglet - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 150
House Finch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 12
Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 7
American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 40
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 31
Number observed: 25

Details

Horse stable area

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 35
Yellow-rumped Warbler - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

___________________________________________________________________

September 23, 2021 Survey Results

This survey marks the first anniversary of the “official” Urban Park Bird Survey!  What a wonderfully pleasant day with temperatures in the high 60s to low 70s, and clear skies with a slight breeze.  Surveyors Lena Hayashi, Jim Kendall, Jim Currie, Brenda Sabin, Dave and Sharon Telford, Claire Grozinger, Betty Kanne, and Kelly Coles went as one group, spending the first part of the morning looking for migrants in the corralled area of the Urban Forest.  We met Roger Schoedl who directed us to look in the horse corral below for a Brewer’s Blackbird.  Though not officially within the Urban Forest, we decided to count it along with the House Sparrows and Red-winged Blackbirds with it.   

          White-crowned Sparrows are back for the winter as are the Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Say’s Phoebes, and Ruby-crowned Kinglets.  As they vocalize all winter, their sounds will become so familiar to us, we may forget to notice them!  We also enjoyed seeing the Townsend’s and Wilson’s Warblers along with a flock of Western Bluebirds.  It is fun and rewarding to bird into the Fall as more birds pass through and some stop to winter.  We are excited to see what the next two months will bring into the Urban Forest.

          In September of 2020, 25 species were seen with 155 individuals.  Today, 33 species were seen with 327 individuals! Enjoy the checklist below and attached photos:

Observations

Number observed: 7
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 17

Allen’s Hummingbird. © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 3

Pacific Slope Flycatchers © James Kendall and Lena Hayashi, Macaulay Library.

Number observed: 4

Black Phoebe. © James Kendall, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 3
Number observed: 29
Number observed: 31
Number observed: 11
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 1

Mockingbird. © Lena Hayashi, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 10
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 99
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 6

American Goldfinch, Lesser Goldfinch and House Finch. © James Kendall, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 9
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3

Spotted Towhee. © James Kendall, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 3
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 5
Number observed: 3

Number observed: 3

L to R: Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler and Townsend’s Warbler. © James Kendall, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 3

Western Tanager

Number observed: 2

___________________________________________________________________

August 27, 2021 Survey Results

27 species observed, 236 individuals

It was calm, clear, and sunny; temperatures in the low 70s rising to a humid 80 degrees. We had three “Jims” (Kendall, Currie and Stacy), Ellen Tipping, Betty Kanne, Brenda Sabin, Nancy Kappelmann, and Maureen Myers, along with me, to survey the start of fall migration. Thanks much to Ellen for recording the count on eBird.

        Some species, like the House Wrens and Spotted Towhees, seem to take up singing again after being silent during nesting. The House Finches were abundant as the UF plants produce seeds after blooming. 

        The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher has returned to winter at the Urban Forest and the Hooded Orioles, that breed here, will soon leave and head south to their wintering grounds. A Western Tanager was seen today and more will be traveling through in the next month. Of interest were two Dark-eyed Juncos in the corralled area of the Urban Forest. These montane birds seem to be nesting in lower elevations and perhaps nested somewhere nearby.  It is normally rare in August to have them here. It will be interesting for us to keep an eye out for them and see if they are present all year around.

These observations are really a credit to the habitat created to support these birds. Thank you to all who volunteer and work so laboriously throughout the year to make the Urban Forest what it is today. 

– Lena

Number observed: 3
Number observed: 5
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 23

Allen’s Hummingbird. Photo by James Kendall.

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 11
Number observed: 26
Number observed: 16
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 75
Number observed: 23
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 4

Number observed: 3

California Towhee. Photo by James Kendall.

Number observed: 2

Hooded Orioles.

Photos by James Kendall.

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 3

Western Tanager

Number observed: 1

Western Tanager.

Photos by James Kendall.

 

July 29, 2021 Survey Results

Thanks to Dave Telford, Jim Kendall, Betty Kanne, and Jim Currie for coming out this morning to conduct the monthly survey. It was a beautiful morning, clear, calm, in the low 70’s with a light and cool ocean breeze. The begging calls of juvenile songbirds from last month were replaced by immature hawks. Two juvenile Cooper’s Hawks were just outside on a wonderfully placed dead snag in the garden facing the stables and Goldenwest Street. After they called, they flew off, but not before we had the opportunity to take some great photos.  Many thanks to the volunteers who created that garden for people and wildlife to enjoy!

Later, as we were walking along the creek paralleling Ellis where the creek makes a 90-degree turn, we heard different hawk sounds in the sycamores. It took some time to find the first juvenile Cooper’s Hawk in the foliage. As we watched its bill, we realized it was not the only one making those sounds. There were a total of three juvenile Cooper’s Hawks!   

Hummingbirds were plentiful in the fragrant and beautifully colored butterfly gardens. What a delight it was for us to just stand and watch them feed as they flew from one flower to another.  However, there were probably as many Green Fruit Beetles as birds today. They are beautiful too! 

– Lena

24 species observed, 212 individuals

Number observed: 13
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 13
Number observed: 31

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

 

Hummingbird sp.

Number observed: 7
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Cooper's Hawk - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

 

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1
Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1
Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 5

Cassin’s/Western Kingbird

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 16
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 20
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 52
Number observed: 19
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1

___________________________________________________________________

June 24, 2021 Survey Results

It was a beautiful morning–clear, calm and a bit overcast in the early hours, but soon brightened up with sunshine and temperatures in the 60s. Thanks to Dave and Sharon Telford, Jim Kendall, Betty Kanne, and Brenda Sabin for coming out to conduct the monthly survey. Special thanks to Brenda for recording the count on eBird.

We quickly realized our ears needed to tune onto the sounds of recently fledged birds and begging noises of those still needing their parents to feed them. It is nice to know we can now document some of the breeding birds in the Urban Forest. A juvenile California Towhee and a Dark-eyed Junco were seen on the ground within the corralled trees on top of the hill.  Young Orange-crowned Warblers were on the branches, fluttering their wings and begging for food.  Small flocks of House Finches were doing the same as were the Lesser and American Goldfinches and Bushtits. The nest boxes were all quiet but we are quite sure the Western Bluebirds and House Wrens were successful breeders. Perhaps some are working on a second clutch. Of note, the Lawrence’s Goldfinch was previously documented to have successfully nested in the Urban Forest within the last two months, though we did not see or hear any of them today.  Allen’s and Anna’s Hummingbirds are everywhere and definitely nested also.    

The Urban Forest is landscaped with all shapes and sizes of vibrantly colored plants in full bloom. We noticed a truckload of trees being planted on the westside hill and look forward to additional habitat and wildlife in the coming years. It’s non-stop work here by the dedicated volunteers. Kudos to them!

28 species observed, 188 individuals

Number observed: 7
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 5
Number observed: 11

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 15
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 18
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 4
House Wren - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 46
House Finch - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 21
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2
Dark-eyed Junco - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi
 Macaulay Library
Dark-eyed Junco - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library 
Dark-eyed Junco - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Dark-eyed Junco - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 1
California Towhee - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
California Towhee - James Kendall

© James Kendall
Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Hooded Oriole - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Hooded Oriole - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 6
Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Common Yellowthroat

Number observed: 6

___________________________________________________________________

May 27, 2021 Survey Results

Sharon and Dave Telford, Jim Currie, Lena Hayashi, Barbara Wasbin, Betty Kanne, Jim Kendall, Mark Johnston, and Brenda Sabin, enjoyed a slightly overcast, but pleasant, clear and calm day with temperatures in the 60s when they set out in May to count all the birds they could see and hear.

The majority of migrants have now passed through this part of the Pacific Flyway, as evidenced by the drop in the number of species from last month’s survey high of 48, to 34 this morning. The growth and expansion of habitat in the Urban Forest has provided these birds more acreage to find rest and food sources, and to better ensure their success along their journey to reach their nesting grounds.

For us, now is the time to enjoy the absolutely beautiful blooms of countless plants, flowering shrubs and leafed out trees in the Urban Forest.  The forever hard-working volunteers must feel so much satisfaction in seeing the fruits of their labor during this season. The colors are brilliant and the experience enchanting.  The surveyors couldn’t be more content while counting and studying the resident and visiting birds of the Urban Forest.

The most vocal nesting birds that can be heard throughout the Urban Forest are the House Wrens, California Towhees, Spotted Towhees, Common Yellowthroats, American and Lesser Goldfinches and the non-native Swinhoe’s White-eyes. A Bushtit, mouth filled with fluff and other nesting material, was seen which means a nest is in the making in a nearby tree. The site of the Lesser Goldfinch nest we saw a female sitting on two months ago is now empty and we hope the chicks fledged successfully. Laura, a UF volunteer, will be happy to know the bluebird box she put up was observed with a male and female Western Bluebird going in and out to feed their young. Many Anna’s and Allen’s Hummingbirds were doing their characteristic mating displays and the sound of hummers flying was everywhere! Flycatchers were plentiful.  We had 5 Ash-throated Flycatchers, a Western Wood-Pewee, 4 Pacific-slope Flycatchers, 7 Cassin’s Kingbirds and 5 Western Kingbirds, and 7 of our familiar Black Phoebes. We also had 5 Warbling Vireos and a Cassin’s Vireo.

What a joy it was to walk through the Urban Forest in the spring, to be outside and in nature, and see plants and animals celebrate this time to reproduce and show off their beauty. What could be better? Many thanks to Brenda Sabin for keeping the eBird list, Jim and Dave for their photos, Sheila Holliday for posting the results and list, and of course Jean Nagy and her crew!

– Lena Hayashi

Number observed: 12

Mallard - James Kendall

Mallard, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 18
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 23
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

Cooper’s Hawk, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

Cooper’s Hawk, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Red-shouldered Hawk

Number observed: 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

Red-shouldered Hawk, © James Kendall
Macaulay Library

Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

Downy Woodpecker

Number observed: 1
 

 

Downy Woodpecker - James Kendall

Downy Woodpecker, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 9
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 10

House Wren - James Kendall

House Wren, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

House Wren - James Kendall

House Wren, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 4

Details: male and female observed entering and exiting box feeding young

Western Bluebird - James Kendall

Western Bluebird, © James Kendall  Macaulay Library

Western Bluebird, © James Kendall  Macaulay Library

Western Bluebird, © Lena Hayashi  Macaulay Library

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 95

Details: many including young fledged birds

Number observed: 27
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 7
Details: Fledgling in a small tree during our observation, neither parent came to feed it.

American Goldfinch - James Kendall

American Goldfinch, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

American Goldfinch - James Kendall

American Goldfinch, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 8
Number observed: 11
Number observed: 1

Details: Unusual vocalization – clear, tonal and fairly long whistle-like note followed by usual pweee ending. Initially thought it was from two different birds but when it flew away, it continued with the two sounds from another location. Syrinx capable of two sounds almost simultaneously.

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 8

___________________________________________________________________

April 29, 2021 Survey Results

It was a beautiful sunny, clear, and calm morning with the temperature in the 60s when Lena Hayashi, Jim Kendall, Betty Kanne, Brenda Sabin, Ellen Tipping, Ellyn Siskind, Barbara Wasbin, Mark Johnston, and Jim Currie began, and around 72 when we finished. We were all anxious to see what birds would be seen during this best month for spring migration. We were not disappointed. We had 349 individual birds and 48 species!

We decided to go together as one group directly to the top of the Urban Forest so we could enjoy the expected migrants around the wonderfully shaded area around the corralled trees. After spending two hours there, we divided into two groups and birded another hour along the more open-spaced grassy areas along Goldenwest and Edwards.  

It was like being in a candy store for birders!  We were sweetly surprised and delighted with sightings everywhere. We had 2 Hermit Warblers, a Townsend’s, 3 Black-throated Grays, and 6 Wilson’s Warblers on their way north to nest in our western states, Canada and beyond. Our resident and nesting warblers, Orange-crowned and Common Yellowthroat were singing their songs in the hope of attracting mates.

Though towhees are usually found on the ground foraging, the California and Spotted were both high off the ground to broadcast their songs more efficiently. This is when it is easy to confuse the Black-head Grosbeaks with the Spotted Towhees as their coloring is so similar. 

A Bushtit, mouth filled with fluff and other nesting material, was seen which means a nest is in the making in a nearby tree. The site of the Lesser Goldfinch nest we saw last month seemed to still be active. Laura, a UF volunteer, will be happy to know the bluebird box she put up was observed with a male Western Bluebird hanging outside the hole (see photo). Not sure if he was checking out the box of if a female was inside. Both Anna’s and Allen’s Hummingbirds were each doing their characteristic mating displays and the sound of hummers flying was everywhere! Flycatchers were plentiful. We had 5 Ash-throated Flycatchers, a Western Wood-Pewee, 4 Pacific-slope Flycatchers, 7 Cassin’s Kingbirds and 5 Western Kingbirds, and 7 of our familiar Black Phoebes. We also had 5 Warbling Vireos and a Cassin’s Vireo.

What a joy it is to walk through the Urban Forest in the Spring, to be outside and in nature and see plants and animals celebrate this time to reproduce and show off their beauty. What could be better? It is fabulously beautiful for the visitors and it must be so rewarding for all the volunteers to reap what they worked so hard to sow. Many thanks to Jean Nagy and all the volunteers!

Mallard

Number observed: 6

     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 15 (many doing courtship displays)

Anna’s Hummingbird, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 26 (many doing courtship displays)
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 1
      Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 1

Western Wood-Pewee, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 1

Cassin’s Vireo, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 17
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 8
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 3

Swallow – species unidentified

     Number observed: 15
     Number observed: 32 (nesting material in bill)
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 6

Western Bluebird, @Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 6
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 31

House Finch, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 24
     Number observed: 12
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 10
     Number observed: 16
     Number observed: 8
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 3

Black-throated Gray Warbler, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 6
     Number observed: 2

___________________________________________________________________

March 25, 2021 Survey Results

“On a brisk morning, in the 50’s with mostly overcast skies, Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne, Jim Kendall, Dave and Sharon Telford, Sandy Smith, Jim Currie, Mark Johnston and Barbara Wasbin, divided up into two groups to count the birds of the Urban Forest.  One group started in the grasslands along Edwards Street while the other counted in the grasslands along Goldenwest Street, both meeting up to survey the “top” together.  Whenever the sun decided to peek out of the clouds, the birds would respond by singing and perching up on branches.  We saw a number of hummingbirds doing their mating displays.  The Anna’s flies high, straight up into the sky and then dive bombs down and right at the last second, making a “pop” sound with its wings, it completes its “J” shaped display.  Allen’s fly up, but not as high as the Anna’s, and then down, and starts a shallow, back and forth, pendulum-like, rocking display.  A number of California Towhees sat high on branches but none seemed to be inclined to sing in the cold, overcast morning. 
      “Now that Spring has sprung, we will be looking for the birds that actually nest in the Urban Forest.  Today, the Lesser Goldfinch is the first nesting species found in the Urban Forest!   Jim Kendall happened to see a bird flying into a young pine tree and then heard another bird and saw wings flapping and the first bird feeding the second and then fly off.   After a considerable amount of time, we located the nest and watched from a distance.  At first, we thought it was a parent feeding young but with the use of a scope, we realized the bird was sitting on the nest, not in it, and could see its feathers were fully developed.  After a bit of research, it was found that Lesser Goldfinches usually nest from April to July on the west coast.  This one is a little early, maybe due to climate change.   The female usually sits quietly, with its tail cocked up at an angle, which this one did, and will lay 4-6 eggs.  We will be excited to check on them at the April survey and give an update.” – Lena Hayashi
Number observed: 2

Details: flyovers

Number observed: 16

Details: mostly flying over in twos

Number observed: 7

Details: heading to stables

Number observed: 7
Number observed: 13
Number observed: 11

Details: some displaying for a mate

Number observed: 13

Details: some displaying for a mate

Number observed: 2

Details:flyovers

Number observed: 1

Details: flyover

Number observed: 1

Details: flyover

Number observed: 1

Details: on a telephone pole just outside UF on Edwards

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 3

Details: singing

Number observed: 3
Cassin's Kingbird - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 10
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 6

Details: singing

Number observed: 23
Number observed: 4

Details:two pairs

Number observed: 4

Details: one within wooden fenced forest

Hermit Thrush - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Number observed: 16
Number observed: 23

Details: nest found in young pine tree with female on nest and male feeding her

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 21
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 12

Details: many on higher branches but not singing

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 26
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 1

___________________________________________________________________

February 25, 2021 Survey Results

Despite an ominous forecast of very high winds, four birders came out for this month’s survey. Fortunately, the winds were not nearly as high as predicted, the temperature ranged from 55 to 70 degrees, and we were able to observe 35 species and 275 birds.

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 3

duck sp.

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3
Mourning Dove - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 11
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1

Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1 (female)
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 7

Black Phoebe - James Kendall Black Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library 
Number observed: 2

Say's Phoebe - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 24
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 18
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 2

Number observed: 10

Western Bluebird - Lena Hayashi© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library Western Bluebird - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library Western Bluebird - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 12
Number observed: 35
Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

 

Number observed: 31
White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 34

Details: One seen on Goldenwest Street-side, high up on top of dead eucalyptus alone. Others seen on Edward’s side. Singing.

Western Meadowlark - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Western Meadowlark - James Kendall
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 18

___________________________________________________________________

January 28, 2021 Survey Results

This Thursday was a cool, sunny, clear, calm 50 degrees. Observations of 32 species and 353 individuals were conducted by Lena Hayashi with Ellen Tipping (ebird), Jim Kendall, Betty Kanne, Jim Currie, Dave and Sharon Tellford. The birders were grateful to be able to survey before the big rain began that evening.

Canada Goose

 Number observed: 2

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 11
Allen's Hummingbird - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 1
Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 1

Male woodpecker © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 3
     Two males, one with orange and white band. One female.
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 3
Cassin's Kingbird - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 42
Bushtit - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 5
Swinhoe's White-eye - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 8
Hermit Thrush - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 29
     Number observed: 33
Lesser Goldfinch - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 77
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 7
California Towhee - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 41
Western Meadowlark - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 6
Common Yellowthroat - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 27

___________________________________________________________________

December 31, 2020 Survey Results:

Among the many birds observed on New Year’s Eve 2020 was this Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, photographed by Birder Lena Hayashi.

In 3 hours and 36 minutes on a calm, 48-62 degree New Year’s Eve day, 9 birders observed 36 species and 382 birds. Birders were delighted to meet Jack, an 11-year-old HB Tree Society volunteer who joined them for awhile. One birder loaned him binoculars and all of them took Jack under their wings. Jack learned quickly how to use the face of a clock to direct observers to where he was seeing a bird. He is a natural!

     Number observed: 34
     Number observed: 11
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 10
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 15
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 4

Details: 3 female 1 male

     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 6
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 52
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 14
     Number observed: 38
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 18

Details: All found in Sycamores feeding on seed pods along creek where it parallels Goldenwest toward the Equestrian Center.

     Number observed: 32
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 6
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 34

Details: In open fields on Edwards side

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 5
Number observed: 36
     Number observed: 2

Details: In Oaks and Tipu trees on top of the Urban Forest

____________________________________________________________________________________________

November 26, 2020 Survey Results:

Eight birders spent 3 hours and 7 minutes on this month’s survey on a 54-60 degree, sunny, calm, clear day. There were 36 species observed (331 individuals).

     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 17
     Number observed: 5

 Details: Mating display

     Number observed: 6

 Details: Mating display

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 1
American White Pelican - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 1

 Details: Flyover

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 3
Red-tailed Hawk - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Nuttall’s Woodpecker

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 3
American Kestrel - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 7
Black Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 4
Say's Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Say's Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 6
Cassin's Kingbird - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 32
Bushtit - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 21

 Details: Varying numbers, several flocks. At least one flock of 15 or so.

     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 8

 Details: Many seen and heard

     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 27
     Number observed: 4

 Details: Male and female seen

     Number observed: 6

 Details: Chucking and vree whistling throughout morning

     Number observed: 50
House Finch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 19
Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 15

 Details: Most seen in Sycamores along the bend of the creek paralleling Goldenwest

American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 28
White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 20
Western Meadowlark - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Western Meadowlark - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed:2
     Number observed:2
Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 12