Birds & Birders in the Urban Forest



Hawks and Hummingbirds – birds commonly seen in the Urban Forest.

Since September 2020 on the last Thursday of each month, birding enthusiasts descend upon the Urban Forest. They use an application called eBird to count all birds they spy during their visit. Here’s what the eBird website says about the impact their efforts have:

eBird plays an increasingly important and diverse role in applied science and conservation. eBird data contribute to hundreds of conservation decisions and peer-reviewed papers, thousands of student projects, and help inform research worldwide. Applications of eBird data range from research and monitoring to conservation planning, including tangible conservation actions such as site and habitat management, species management, habitat protection, and informing law and policy…we are committed to ensuring that your data will be put to the best use possible for research, conservation, and education.

eBird data document bird distribution, abundance, habitat use, and trends. Birders enter when, where, and how they went birding, and then fill out a checklist of all the birds seen and heard during the outing.”

Boundaries of the HB Urban Forest survey are: HB Central Park Dog Park and equestrian stables to the north, Edward’s to the east, Ellis Avenue to the south and Goldenwest Street to the west. Bird reports are submitted by lead birder Lena Hayashi.

November 26, 2021 Observations

29 species observed, 274 individuals

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Cedar Waxwings, a welcome wintertime spectacle

The ripening of red winter berries coincides with the arrival of large flocks of these dazzling beauties. Elegant Cedar Waxwings sport a rakish black mask and sleek pointed crest plus silky beige plumage tipped in waxy red and yellow. Listen for the high-pitched, trilled whistle as dozens descend from the treetops to feast on the festive red berries of the California native Toyon bush so very plentiful in the Urban Forest and throughout Huntington Central Park. It is an unforgettable wintertime spectacle.

Cedar Waxwings, spied by birders observing in the Urban Forest on Nov. 26, 2021, and photographed by James Kendall.

  1. Number observed: 1
  2. Number observed: 6
  3. Number observed: 6
  4. Number observed: 1
    Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  5. Number observed: 2
    American Kestrel photos by © James Kendall Macaulay LibraryAmerican Kestrel - James Kendall American Kestrel - James Kendall
    American Kestrel - James Kendall American Kestrel - James Kendall
  6. Number observed: 1
  7. Number observed: 7
    Black Phoebe - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  8. Number observed: 1
  9. Number observed: 1
  10. Number observed: 45
  11. Number observed: 16
  12. Number observed: 3
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  13. Number observed: 1
  14. Number observed: 4
  15. Number observed: 1
  16. Number observed: 5
  17. Number observed: 50
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  18. Number observed: 23
  19. Number observed: 2
  20. Number observed: 10
    American Goldfinch - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  21. Number observed: 51
    White-crowned Sparrow, photos © James Kendall Macaulay LibraryWhite-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
  22. Number observed: 1
    Golden-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  23. Number observed: 8
    Song Sparrow - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  24. Number observed: 3
    California Towhee - James Kendall
    © James Kendall Macaulay Library
  25. Number observed: 1
  26. Number observed: 6
  27. Number observed: 2
  28. Number observed: 2
  29. Number observed: 14
    Yellow-rumped Warbler - James Kendall

___________________________________________________________________

October 28. 2021 Survey Results

Savannah Sparrow, American Kestrel and Lesser Goldfinch, photographed during the October survey in the Urban Forest. © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Lena Hayashi, Jim Kendall, Dave and Sharon Telford, Betty Kanne, Jim Currie, Barbara Wasbin, and Nancy Kappelmann counted the UF birds on this clear, calm, sunny but cool, and beautiful day–60 degrees to start and a comfortable 73 degrees at the end.  Monday’s rain added much-needed moisture to the dry fields and washed dust off the trees and bushes.  A highlight was seeing two female American Kestrels, shown below.  One was banded and probably the same one we saw earlier in the year.

As surveyors, we contribute to the science and knowledge of birds. At the same time, we enjoy the experience of learning and teaching each other new skills.  As the seasons change, so do the appearances of the birds.  Today, we heard both the American and Lesser Goldfinches.  They were in the same Sycamore tree.  To get an accurate count, the challenge was to look at each one and be able to identify each species.  Some males were fairly easy, but there were some complicated “tweeners” transitioning to winter plumage, that shared similar field marks.  We had a great time trying to decide which was what!  It is so much fun to have a group of birders who enjoy getting together each month to participate in citizen science, try to do a good job, and keep our minds sharp.  So what if we make mistakes and next year we forget and have to learn it again?  That’s part of the fun friends have together.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER BIRD OF THE MONTH:
Western Meadowlarks, field foragers

The Western Meadowlark is a beautiful, medium-sized bird that gathers in sizable flocks on the dry grassy fields surrounding the Urban Forest each winter. They arrive in October from their spring/summer breeding grounds and find strength and safety in numbers on the hilltop area as they collectively feed on insects and seeds at the ground level. The striking yellow and black underside plumage is very well camouflaged as they feed low in the field due to wing and back feathers perfectly colored to blend in with the brown, beige and tan grasses of the winter field. It takes a patient and attentive eye to survey the field and notice the presence of the flock due to this deceptive coloration. Yet, the astute observer will be rewarded when the whole flock is suddenly flushed into the air, revealing the bright yellow undersides and black necklace along with a flash of white at the edges of the tail. It’s a joy to see and well worth the wait.

October 2021 Observations

32 species observed, 446 individuals

Number observed: 20
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 12
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
White-tailed Kite - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2
American Kestrel - Lena Hayashi

American Kestrel, © Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

American Kestrel - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 3
Say's Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Cassin's Kingbird - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 27
Number observed: 1
Horned Lark - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Horned Lark - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 15

Number observed: 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - James KendallRuby-crowned Kinglet - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 150
House Finch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 12
Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 7
American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 40
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 31
Number observed: 25

Details

Horse stable area

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 35
Yellow-rumped Warbler - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

___________________________________________________________________

September 23, 2021 Survey Results

This survey marks the first anniversary of the “official” Urban Park Bird Survey!  What a wonderfully pleasant day with temperatures in the high 60s to low 70s, and clear skies with a slight breeze.  Surveyors Lena Hayashi, Jim Kendall, Jim Currie, Brenda Sabin, Dave and Sharon Telford, Claire Grozinger, Betty Kanne, and Kelly Coles went as one group, spending the first part of the morning looking for migrants in the corralled area of the Urban Forest.  We met Roger Schoedl who directed us to look in the horse corral below for a Brewer’s Blackbird.  Though not officially within the Urban Forest, we decided to count it along with the House Sparrows and Red-winged Blackbirds with it.   

          White-crowned Sparrows are back for the winter as are the Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Say’s Phoebes, and Ruby-crowned Kinglets.  As they vocalize all winter, their sounds will become so familiar to us, we may forget to notice them!  We also enjoyed seeing the Townsend’s and Wilson’s Warblers along with a flock of Western Bluebirds.  It is fun and rewarding to bird into the Fall as more birds pass through and some stop to winter.  We are excited to see what the next two months will bring into the Urban Forest.

          In September of 2020, 25 species were seen with 155 individuals.  Today, 33 species were seen with 327 individuals! Enjoy the checklist below and attached photos:

Observations

Number observed: 7
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 17

Allen’s Hummingbird. © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 3

Pacific Slope Flycatchers © James Kendall and Lena Hayashi, Macaulay Library.

Number observed: 4

Black Phoebe. © James Kendall, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 3
Number observed: 29
Number observed: 31
Number observed: 11
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 1

Mockingbird. © Lena Hayashi, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 10
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 99
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 6

American Goldfinch, Lesser Goldfinch and House Finch. © James Kendall, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 9
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3

Spotted Towhee. © James Kendall, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 3
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 5
Number observed: 3

Number observed: 3

L to R: Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler and Townsend’s Warbler. © James Kendall, Macaulay Library

Number observed: 3

Western Tanager

Number observed: 2

___________________________________________________________________

August 27, 2021 Survey Results

27 species observed, 236 individuals

It was calm, clear, and sunny; temperatures in the low 70s rising to a humid 80 degrees. We had three “Jims” (Kendall, Currie and Stacy), Ellen Tipping, Betty Kanne, Brenda Sabin, Nancy Kappelmann, and Maureen Myers, along with me, to survey the start of fall migration. Thanks much to Ellen for recording the count on eBird.

        Some species, like the House Wrens and Spotted Towhees, seem to take up singing again after being silent during nesting. The House Finches were abundant as the UF plants produce seeds after blooming. 

        The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher has returned to winter at the Urban Forest and the Hooded Orioles, that breed here, will soon leave and head south to their wintering grounds. A Western Tanager was seen today and more will be traveling through in the next month. Of interest were two Dark-eyed Juncos in the corralled area of the Urban Forest. These montane birds seem to be nesting in lower elevations and perhaps nested somewhere nearby.  It is normally rare in August to have them here. It will be interesting for us to keep an eye out for them and see if they are present all year around.

These observations are really a credit to the habitat created to support these birds. Thank you to all who volunteer and work so laboriously throughout the year to make the Urban Forest what it is today. 

– Lena

Number observed: 3
Number observed: 5
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 23

Allen’s Hummingbird. Photo by James Kendall.

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 11
Number observed: 26
Number observed: 16
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 75
Number observed: 23
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 4

Number observed: 3

California Towhee. Photo by James Kendall.

Number observed: 2

Hooded Orioles.

Photos by James Kendall.

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 3

Western Tanager

Number observed: 1

Western Tanager.

Photos by James Kendall.

 

July 29, 2021 Survey Results

Thanks to Dave Telford, Jim Kendall, Betty Kanne, and Jim Currie for coming out this morning to conduct the monthly survey. It was a beautiful morning, clear, calm, in the low 70’s with a light and cool ocean breeze. The begging calls of juvenile songbirds from last month were replaced by immature hawks. Two juvenile Cooper’s Hawks were just outside on a wonderfully placed dead snag in the garden facing the stables and Goldenwest Street. After they called, they flew off, but not before we had the opportunity to take some great photos.  Many thanks to the volunteers who created that garden for people and wildlife to enjoy!

Later, as we were walking along the creek paralleling Ellis where the creek makes a 90-degree turn, we heard different hawk sounds in the sycamores. It took some time to find the first juvenile Cooper’s Hawk in the foliage. As we watched its bill, we realized it was not the only one making those sounds. There were a total of three juvenile Cooper’s Hawks!   

Hummingbirds were plentiful in the fragrant and beautifully colored butterfly gardens. What a delight it was for us to just stand and watch them feed as they flew from one flower to another.  However, there were probably as many Green Fruit Beetles as birds today. They are beautiful too! 

– Lena

24 species observed, 212 individuals

Number observed: 13
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 13
Number observed: 31

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

 

Hummingbird sp.

Number observed: 7
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Cooper's Hawk - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

 

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1
Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1
Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 5

Cassin’s/Western Kingbird

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 16
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 20
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 52
Number observed: 19
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1

___________________________________________________________________

June 24, 2021 Survey Results

It was a beautiful morning–clear, calm and a bit overcast in the early hours, but soon brightened up with sunshine and temperatures in the 60s. Thanks to Dave and Sharon Telford, Jim Kendall, Betty Kanne, and Brenda Sabin for coming out to conduct the monthly survey. Special thanks to Brenda for recording the count on eBird.

We quickly realized our ears needed to tune onto the sounds of recently fledged birds and begging noises of those still needing their parents to feed them. It is nice to know we can now document some of the breeding birds in the Urban Forest. A juvenile California Towhee and a Dark-eyed Junco were seen on the ground within the corralled trees on top of the hill.  Young Orange-crowned Warblers were on the branches, fluttering their wings and begging for food.  Small flocks of House Finches were doing the same as were the Lesser and American Goldfinches and Bushtits. The nest boxes were all quiet but we are quite sure the Western Bluebirds and House Wrens were successful breeders. Perhaps some are working on a second clutch. Of note, the Lawrence’s Goldfinch was previously documented to have successfully nested in the Urban Forest within the last two months, though we did not see or hear any of them today.  Allen’s and Anna’s Hummingbirds are everywhere and definitely nested also.    

The Urban Forest is landscaped with all shapes and sizes of vibrantly colored plants in full bloom. We noticed a truckload of trees being planted on the westside hill and look forward to additional habitat and wildlife in the coming years. It’s non-stop work here by the dedicated volunteers. Kudos to them!

28 species observed, 188 individuals

Number observed: 7
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 5
Number observed: 11

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 15
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 18
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 4
House Wren - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 46
House Finch - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 21
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2
Dark-eyed Junco - Lena Hayashi

© Lena Hayashi
 Macaulay Library
Dark-eyed Junco - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library 
Dark-eyed Junco - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Dark-eyed Junco - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 1
California Towhee - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
California Towhee - James Kendall

© James Kendall
Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Hooded Oriole - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Hooded Oriole - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Number observed: 6
Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall

© James Kendall
 Macaulay Library
Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Common Yellowthroat

Number observed: 6

___________________________________________________________________

May 27, 2021 Survey Results

Sharon and Dave Telford, Jim Currie, Lena Hayashi, Barbara Wasbin, Betty Kanne, Jim Kendall, Mark Johnston, and Brenda Sabin, enjoyed a slightly overcast, but pleasant, clear and calm day with temperatures in the 60s when they set out in May to count all the birds they could see and hear.

The majority of migrants have now passed through this part of the Pacific Flyway, as evidenced by the drop in the number of species from last month’s survey high of 48, to 34 this morning. The growth and expansion of habitat in the Urban Forest has provided these birds more acreage to find rest and food sources, and to better ensure their success along their journey to reach their nesting grounds.

For us, now is the time to enjoy the absolutely beautiful blooms of countless plants, flowering shrubs and leafed out trees in the Urban Forest.  The forever hard-working volunteers must feel so much satisfaction in seeing the fruits of their labor during this season. The colors are brilliant and the experience enchanting.  The surveyors couldn’t be more content while counting and studying the resident and visiting birds of the Urban Forest.

The most vocal nesting birds that can be heard throughout the Urban Forest are the House Wrens, California Towhees, Spotted Towhees, Common Yellowthroats, American and Lesser Goldfinches and the non-native Swinhoe’s White-eyes. A Bushtit, mouth filled with fluff and other nesting material, was seen which means a nest is in the making in a nearby tree. The site of the Lesser Goldfinch nest we saw a female sitting on two months ago is now empty and we hope the chicks fledged successfully. Laura, a UF volunteer, will be happy to know the bluebird box she put up was observed with a male and female Western Bluebird going in and out to feed their young. Many Anna’s and Allen’s Hummingbirds were doing their characteristic mating displays and the sound of hummers flying was everywhere! Flycatchers were plentiful.  We had 5 Ash-throated Flycatchers, a Western Wood-Pewee, 4 Pacific-slope Flycatchers, 7 Cassin’s Kingbirds and 5 Western Kingbirds, and 7 of our familiar Black Phoebes. We also had 5 Warbling Vireos and a Cassin’s Vireo.

What a joy it was to walk through the Urban Forest in the spring, to be outside and in nature, and see plants and animals celebrate this time to reproduce and show off their beauty. What could be better? Many thanks to Brenda Sabin for keeping the eBird list, Jim and Dave for their photos, Sheila Holliday for posting the results and list, and of course Jean Nagy and her crew!

– Lena Hayashi

Number observed: 12

Mallard - James Kendall

Mallard, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 18
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 23
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 2

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

Cooper’s Hawk, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Cooper's Hawk - James Kendall

Cooper’s Hawk, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Red-shouldered Hawk

Number observed: 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

Red-shouldered Hawk, © James Kendall
Macaulay Library

Red-shouldered Hawk - James Kendall

Downy Woodpecker

Number observed: 1
 

 

Downy Woodpecker - James Kendall

Downy Woodpecker, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 9
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 10

House Wren - James Kendall

House Wren, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

House Wren - James Kendall

House Wren, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 4

Details: male and female observed entering and exiting box feeding young

Western Bluebird - James Kendall

Western Bluebird, © James Kendall  Macaulay Library

Western Bluebird, © James Kendall  Macaulay Library

Western Bluebird, © Lena Hayashi  Macaulay Library

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 95

Details: many including young fledged birds

Number observed: 27
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 7
Details: Fledgling in a small tree during our observation, neither parent came to feed it.

American Goldfinch - James Kendall

American Goldfinch, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

American Goldfinch - James Kendall

American Goldfinch, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 8
Number observed: 11
Number observed: 1

Details: Unusual vocalization – clear, tonal and fairly long whistle-like note followed by usual pweee ending. Initially thought it was from two different birds but when it flew away, it continued with the two sounds from another location. Syrinx capable of two sounds almost simultaneously.

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 8

___________________________________________________________________

April 29, 2021 Survey Results

It was a beautiful sunny, clear, and calm morning with the temperature in the 60s when Lena Hayashi, Jim Kendall, Betty Kanne, Brenda Sabin, Ellen Tipping, Ellyn Siskind, Barbara Wasbin, Mark Johnston, and Jim Currie began, and around 72 when we finished. We were all anxious to see what birds would be seen during this best month for spring migration. We were not disappointed. We had 349 individual birds and 48 species!

We decided to go together as one group directly to the top of the Urban Forest so we could enjoy the expected migrants around the wonderfully shaded area around the corralled trees. After spending two hours there, we divided into two groups and birded another hour along the more open-spaced grassy areas along Goldenwest and Edwards.  

It was like being in a candy store for birders!  We were sweetly surprised and delighted with sightings everywhere. We had 2 Hermit Warblers, a Townsend’s, 3 Black-throated Grays, and 6 Wilson’s Warblers on their way north to nest in our western states, Canada and beyond. Our resident and nesting warblers, Orange-crowned and Common Yellowthroat were singing their songs in the hope of attracting mates.

Though towhees are usually found on the ground foraging, the California and Spotted were both high off the ground to broadcast their songs more efficiently. This is when it is easy to confuse the Black-head Grosbeaks with the Spotted Towhees as their coloring is so similar. 

A Bushtit, mouth filled with fluff and other nesting material, was seen which means a nest is in the making in a nearby tree. The site of the Lesser Goldfinch nest we saw last month seemed to still be active. Laura, a UF volunteer, will be happy to know the bluebird box she put up was observed with a male Western Bluebird hanging outside the hole (see photo). Not sure if he was checking out the box of if a female was inside. Both Anna’s and Allen’s Hummingbirds were each doing their characteristic mating displays and the sound of hummers flying was everywhere! Flycatchers were plentiful. We had 5 Ash-throated Flycatchers, a Western Wood-Pewee, 4 Pacific-slope Flycatchers, 7 Cassin’s Kingbirds and 5 Western Kingbirds, and 7 of our familiar Black Phoebes. We also had 5 Warbling Vireos and a Cassin’s Vireo.

What a joy it is to walk through the Urban Forest in the Spring, to be outside and in nature and see plants and animals celebrate this time to reproduce and show off their beauty. What could be better? It is fabulously beautiful for the visitors and it must be so rewarding for all the volunteers to reap what they worked so hard to sow. Many thanks to Jean Nagy and all the volunteers!

Mallard

Number observed: 6

     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 15 (many doing courtship displays)

Anna’s Hummingbird, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 26 (many doing courtship displays)
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 1
      Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 1

Western Wood-Pewee, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 1

Cassin’s Vireo, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 17
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 8
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 3

Swallow – species unidentified

     Number observed: 15
     Number observed: 32 (nesting material in bill)
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 6

Western Bluebird, @Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 6
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 31

House Finch, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 24
     Number observed: 12
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 10
     Number observed: 16
     Number observed: 8
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 3

Black-throated Gray Warbler, © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 6
     Number observed: 2

___________________________________________________________________

March 25, 2021 Survey Results

“On a brisk morning, in the 50’s with mostly overcast skies, Lena Hayashi, Betty Kanne, Jim Kendall, Dave and Sharon Telford, Sandy Smith, Jim Currie, Mark Johnston and Barbara Wasbin, divided up into two groups to count the birds of the Urban Forest.  One group started in the grasslands along Edwards Street while the other counted in the grasslands along Goldenwest Street, both meeting up to survey the “top” together.  Whenever the sun decided to peek out of the clouds, the birds would respond by singing and perching up on branches.  We saw a number of hummingbirds doing their mating displays.  The Anna’s flies high, straight up into the sky and then dive bombs down and right at the last second, making a “pop” sound with its wings, it completes its “J” shaped display.  Allen’s fly up, but not as high as the Anna’s, and then down, and starts a shallow, back and forth, pendulum-like, rocking display.  A number of California Towhees sat high on branches but none seemed to be inclined to sing in the cold, overcast morning. 
      “Now that Spring has sprung, we will be looking for the birds that actually nest in the Urban Forest.  Today, the Lesser Goldfinch is the first nesting species found in the Urban Forest!   Jim Kendall happened to see a bird flying into a young pine tree and then heard another bird and saw wings flapping and the first bird feeding the second and then fly off.   After a considerable amount of time, we located the nest and watched from a distance.  At first, we thought it was a parent feeding young but with the use of a scope, we realized the bird was sitting on the nest, not in it, and could see its feathers were fully developed.  After a bit of research, it was found that Lesser Goldfinches usually nest from April to July on the west coast.  This one is a little early, maybe due to climate change.   The female usually sits quietly, with its tail cocked up at an angle, which this one did, and will lay 4-6 eggs.  We will be excited to check on them at the April survey and give an update.” – Lena Hayashi
Number observed: 2

Details: flyovers

Number observed: 16

Details: mostly flying over in twos

Number observed: 7

Details: heading to stables

Number observed: 7
Number observed: 13
Number observed: 11

Details: some displaying for a mate

Number observed: 13

Details: some displaying for a mate

Number observed: 2

Details:flyovers

Number observed: 1

Details: flyover

Number observed: 1

Details: flyover

Number observed: 1

Details: on a telephone pole just outside UF on Edwards

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 3

Details: singing

Number observed: 3
Cassin's Kingbird - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Number observed: 14
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 10
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 6

Details: singing

Number observed: 23
Number observed: 4

Details:two pairs

Number observed: 4

Details: one within wooden fenced forest

Hermit Thrush - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Number observed: 16
Number observed: 23

Details: nest found in young pine tree with female on nest and male feeding her

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 21
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 12

Details: many on higher branches but not singing

Number observed: 1
Number observed: 26
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 6
Number observed: 1

___________________________________________________________________

February 25, 2021 Survey Results

Despite an ominous forecast of very high winds, four birders came out for this month’s survey. Fortunately, the winds were not nearly as high as predicted, the temperature ranged from 55 to 70 degrees, and we were able to observe 35 species and 275 birds.

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 3

duck sp.

Number observed: 2
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 3
Mourning Dove - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 11
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1

Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 1 (female)
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Number observed: 7

Black Phoebe - James Kendall Black Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library 
Number observed: 2

Say's Phoebe - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 24
Number observed: 2
Number observed: 18
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 3
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 2

Number observed: 10

Western Bluebird - Lena Hayashi© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library Western Bluebird - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library Western Bluebird - James Kendall© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 8
Number observed: 12
Number observed: 35
Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

 

Number observed: 31
White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Number observed: 7
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 34

Details: One seen on Goldenwest Street-side, high up on top of dead eucalyptus alone. Others seen on Edward’s side. Singing.

Western Meadowlark - James Kendall

© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Western Meadowlark - James Kendall
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 1
Number observed: 4
Number observed: 18

___________________________________________________________________

January 28, 2021 Survey Results

This Thursday was a cool, sunny, clear, calm 50 degrees. Observations of 32 species and 353 individuals were conducted by Lena Hayashi with Ellen Tipping (ebird), Jim Kendall, Betty Kanne, Jim Currie, Dave and Sharon Tellford. The birders were grateful to be able to survey before the big rain began that evening.

Canada Goose

 Number observed: 2

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 11
Allen's Hummingbird - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 1
Red-shouldered Hawk - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 1

Male woodpecker © James Kendall Macaulay Library

     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 3
     Two males, one with orange and white band. One female.
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 3
Cassin's Kingbird - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 42
Bushtit - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 5
Swinhoe's White-eye - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 8
Hermit Thrush - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 29
     Number observed: 33
Lesser Goldfinch - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 77
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 7
California Towhee - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 41
Western Meadowlark - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 6
Common Yellowthroat - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 27

___________________________________________________________________

December 31, 2020 Survey Results:

Among the many birds observed on New Year’s Eve 2020 was this Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, photographed by Birder Lena Hayashi.

In 3 hours and 36 minutes on a calm, 48-62 degree New Year’s Eve day, 9 birders observed 36 species and 382 birds. Birders were delighted to meet Jack, an 11-year-old HB Tree Society volunteer who joined them for awhile. One birder loaned him binoculars and all of them took Jack under their wings. Jack learned quickly how to use the face of a clock to direct observers to where he was seeing a bird. He is a natural!

     Number observed: 34
     Number observed: 11
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 10
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 15
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 4

Details: 3 female 1 male

     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 6
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 52
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 9
     Number observed: 14
     Number observed: 38
     Number observed: 5
     Number observed: 18

Details: All found in Sycamores feeding on seed pods along creek where it parallels Goldenwest toward the Equestrian Center.

     Number observed: 32
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 6
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 34

Details: In open fields on Edwards side

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 5
Number observed: 36
     Number observed: 2

Details: In Oaks and Tipu trees on top of the Urban Forest

____________________________________________________________________________________________

November 26, 2020 Survey Results:

Eight birders spent 3 hours and 7 minutes on this month’s survey on a 54-60 degree, sunny, calm, clear day. There were 36 species observed (331 individuals).

     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 17
     Number observed: 5

 Details: Mating display

     Number observed: 6

 Details: Mating display

Allen's Hummingbird - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3

 Details: Fly over

     Number observed: 1

 Details: Fly over

American White Pelican - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 1

 Details: Flyover

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 3

Details: Differentiated 3 hawks: 2 Adult and 1 immature

Red-tailed Hawk - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Red-tailed Hawk - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library

Nuttall’s Woodpecker

     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 1
     Number observed: 3

 Details: 1 male and female in open field on Sycamore and sign posts by Edwards.
Second female down creek path before the crossing up toward Goldenwest.

American Kestrel - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Kestrel - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 7
Black Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 4
Say's Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Say's Phoebe - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 6
Cassin's Kingbird - Lena Hayashi
© Lena Hayashi Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 3
     Number observed: 32
Bushtit - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 21

 Details: Varying numbers, several flocks. At least one flock of 15 or so.

     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 8

 Details: Many seen and heard

     Number observed: 3

 Details: Scolding. Two seen together on fence line of equestrian center.

     Number observed: 27
     Number observed: 4

 Details: Male and female seen

     Number observed: 6

 Details: Chucking and vree whistling throughout morning

     Number observed: 50
House Finch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 19
Lesser Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 15

 Details: Most seen in Sycamores along the bend of the creek paralleling Goldenwest

American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
American Goldfinch - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 28
White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
White-crowned Sparrow - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 4
     Number observed: 2
     Number observed: 20

 Details: In the field south of Dog Park and Edwards Street

Western Meadowlark - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
Western Meadowlark - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed:2
     Number observed:2
Orange-crowned Warbler - James Kendall
© James Kendall Macaulay Library
     Number observed: 7
     Number observed: 12